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Posts from the ‘employee engagement’ Category

Tales of Innovation in Government Finance

Just got back from Denver where I attended the 111th Annual GFOA Conference.  Wow, we’ve come a long way in 111 years!  What I love most about attending this event are the stories of innovation that inspire and motivate other communities to want to do more for their citizens.  As I mapped out my agenda of sessions that I wanted to attend, topics like transparency, ROI, engagement strategy, and ERP looked promising.

Naturally, I was looking for some sessions that focused on the workforce and I found it in a session called “How to Measure a High Performing Finance Office”.  This session was so crowded that I had to sit on the floor for the whole hour and a half.  But it was worth it.  Great speakers, interesting perspectives, and very informative.  Brendan Hanlon, CFO at the City & County of Denver kicked things off by addressing data and how it impacts performance management.  He advises to not just look at the data, but look for ways to improve performance.

Denver uses a Business Intelligence (BI) tool to help create dashboards to report and measure using data from different departments.  For example, he showed a chart depicting paychecks issued through direct deposit and those issued with an actual check.  The goal is defined; Get more people using direct deposit.  They use the data they had to measure the progress made over the past couple of years.

The next speaker, Judith Marte, CFO at Miami-Dade County Schools, came in talking about sustainability (and not the “green” kind).  No, this is the sustainability that goes hand-in-hand with succession planning.  Very early in her presentation, she said “I want to have a staff who can function without me.”  That statement can take anyone aback when they first hear it, but what she meant was she should not be the only one who can do her job.  She must have successors who could easily step in should she leave or retire.  She goes on to give advice about looking for “non-traditional” candidates and taking the inexperienced and training them.

To wrap up the session was the City of Madison Finance Director, David Schmiedicke.  David approached the topic of performance by speaking to cross training your employees to address areas with the greatest need and pair up with mentors as needed. He also made an interesting point about turn-over being an opportunity.  That it brings in new people who might have different skill sets and be willing to more freely embrace web-based solutions.

Overall, the theme of measuring and developing your workforce rang loud and clear.  The speakers set a good example of how to engage your employees by providing opportunities to enhance skill sets, grow personally and professionally, and feedback to understand the value they bring to the community.  Your employees are your single greatest asset and these leaders know how to treat them right.

 

 

In Search of the Perfect Paycheck

The same scenario plays out every week.  Employees do their job and employers pay them for that job.  Sounds simple, right?  Well, sometimes processes break-down and that paycheck is impacted.  Have you ever had a paycheck that was inaccurate, late, or worse didn’t come at all?  Suddenly, the employee and employer have an issue at hand that has more than just monetary implications.

According to a new survey from The Workforce Institute at Kronos Incorporated an estimated 82 million1 Americans – more than half of the U.S. workforce – have experienced a problem with their paycheck during their career.  The results of the survey go on to say that more than a quarter (26 percent) of hourly workers have been paid too little, while 15 percent say they’ve been paid late. For the salaried worker, 15 percent say they’ve been shortchanged in their check and 16 percent report being paid late.

On the flip side of things, there’s also the issue of paying employees too much.  Calculations errors aren’t uncommon when time & attendance is tracked on paper.  The survey found, on average, American workers say they must likely be overpaid a staggering $463 before alerting their employer to the mistake.

Public sector employers have an additional risk to adverse side effects from an incorrect paycheck.  Regardless of underpayment or overpayment, the threat of the media putting a spotlight on perceived wasteful spending is real.  It signifies a weakness that the organization isn’t in complete control over their payroll processes.

The truth is, Payroll employees are often over-burdened by illegible hand-writing, late or incomplete time sheets, and the sheer volume of paper that comes in.  With this environment comes the potential for errors. Looking for areas of efficiency can lead to better accuracy and even cost savings.

Footnote 1: Calculation based on the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics report from January 2017 that estimates there are 152.08 million employed people in the U.S.: 152.08M x 54% = 82.12 million.

Are You Turning to Your Employees for Advice?

Employees are the most valuable assets of an organization.  Government entities rely on them to deliver services to the community and often times they go above and beyond what is within their job description when resources are tight.  Yet when looking for areas of efficiency and ways to save money, they aren’t always the first to be asked.

Historically, employees on the front lines have been overlooked as idea generators.  In 1911, Frederick Taylor published “The Principles of Scientific Management” to address the relationship between managers and those employees who are on the front lines.  His theory that managers were the planners and the employees were there to perform the tasks was well received during his time. But over time, employers have evolved to recognize someone performing “tasks” may have more insight on how to create efficiency or come up with a new process than someone who sits at a distance.

Many states are looking within for innovative ways to improve services and save money. Pennsylvania, launched a website so employees can submit cost saving ideas to help balance the budget.  California has something similar called the Employee Suggestion Program.  In a 2014 interview with Kari Ehrman, Merit Award Program Manager, she was asked what makes this program so successful; she responded, “The main reason was because it received top management support”.

Programs like this help drive employee engagement.  Many take pride in what they do.  If they find a way to make something more efficient, cost effective, or safer, their ideas should be heard.  More collaboration between employees and leaders can result in a more productive workforce.

The Year of Retention

Retention seems to be a popular word this year.  HR leaders across all levels of government are in a state of worry.  Attract and retain…  Attract and retain…  This is the mantra by which public sector employers are living and breathing.  So what’s all the fuss about?

As more employees are reaching retirement age, they know a plethora of knowledge will be walking out the door with each employee.  So governments are deep in succession planning and strategizing to address this.  But it’s also made many acutely aware that they need to figure out ways to retain this new generation of employees who are filling in these gaps.  With pensions in the condition they are and pay often lower than the private sector, what’s the draw to make them want to stay?

Regardless of the generation, people still believe in making a difference.  Whether it’s for their community or to make a difference in peoples lives, public service tends to draw people in.  But it doesn’t necessarily make them want to stay.  Employees want to be recognized for a job well done and offered opportunities to advance their careers.  They want to be part of decision making and know their voice is being heard.

According to an article written by Neil Reichenburg of IPMA-HR, Getting the Right People, employee engagement matters. “Engaged employees are five times more likely to be very satisfied, five times more likely to recommend their place of employment to others, and four times less likely to leave.

Engagement is not a one-size fits all; we are all individuals.  What motivates one person, might not motivate the next.  As managers and leaders address the reality of what retention means to their organization, they will discover there are multiple paths to create an environment employees can thrive in. And maybe, the employees who came into the public sector for the right reasons will want to stay a little while longer.